Monthly Archives: November 2015

Recipe for Marinated Grilled Leg of Lamb, mid-eastern style

Marinated Grilled Leg of Lamb

Boned leg on Grill

Yogurt-Mint Marinated Grilled Leg of Lamb (middle-Eastern style)

– submitted by Rick and Janina Prociuk

Prep Time: 10 min  (more if leg needs to be deboned)
Inactive Prep Time: 8 hr 10 min
Cook Time: 1 hr 30 min
Serves: 8 servings

Ingredients
• 1 de-boned Leg of Lamb (approx. 5 pounds), trimmed of excess fat
• 5 cloves garlic, peeled and thinly sliced
• 2 cups Greek-style yogurt (regular yogurt, at least 3% butterfat)
• 1/2 cup fresh mint leaves
• 2 teaspoons ground cumin
• 3 to 5 dashes hot pepper sauce
• Salt and freshly ground black pepper

Directions
Using a paring knife, make several small slits over the entire surface of the lamb, and stuff the slits with the sliced garlic. Add the mint, garlic, cumin and hot pepper sauce to a food processor and process until finely chopped. Add yogurt and mix by hand. Place the lamb on a large baking sheet. Make several shallow cuts into the skin side to allow marinate to seep in and rub the entire leg with the yogurt mixture. Cover or place in ziplock bag and refrigerate for at least 8 hours, or overnight.

Preheat the grill to high. Remove the lamb from the marinade and season well with salt and pepper. Place the lamb, skin side down, on the grill. Grill until the skin side is golden brown, then turn the lamb over, and reduce the heat of the grill to medium so that the grill maintains a constant temperature of 350 degrees F. Continue grilling until a thermometer inserted deep into the meat reaches a temperature of 145 degrees F for medium-rare about 1 1/4 to 1 1/2 hours. Remove lamb from grill, cover with foil, and let rest for 10 minutes. Slice the meat on the bias into 1/4-inch thick slices.

Use the marinade as a basting sauce while grilling. Rather than trust the cooking times above –except as a guide for done-ness– trust your instinct and the feel of the meat, checking with a meat thermometer from time to time.

We’ve used this recipe for over 40 years, and it was called Caucasian Lamb in our Russian Cooking book.(Bantam ed) c. early 70s Rick and Janina Prociuk

For lamb from Topsy Farms see http://topsyfarms.com/lamb. Or call the farm at 888 287-3157. Thanks to our friends and customers for this recipe.

Needle-felted Sir John A. Macdonald

The Wool Shed at Topsy Farms was visited by a life-sized, needle-felted Sir John A. Macdonald.

Closeup of Sir John A., outdoors

Closeup of Sir John A. sculpture

He is an amazingly realistic, life-sized, well-dressed sculpture, who rides in the front passenger seat of a car, or in an antique ‘push-chair’.

He ‘lives’, much of the time, clutching an empty glass, awaiting his next refill.

This needle-felted Sir John A. Macdonald was made entirely of wool.

The sculpture of ‘the Father of Confederation’ was made by Gesina Laird-Buchanan on the 200th anniversary of his birth, for an International Bridge Tournament in Kingston.

Gesina said “it took 8 small fleeces to create him”. Some days I felt so obsessed, I worked on him non-stop from 8 am until after midnight.”

Gesina is an experienced sculptor in clay (see http://studiogesina.weebly.com/). Working with wool was new to her, but she learned fast, finding many similarities to clay sculpting.

She said “I started with his head and face. If I couldn’t succeed in finding his true likeness, there was no point in working on his body”.

Sir John A. inside Wool Shed showing yarn in back ground, holding roving

Sir John A. inside Wool Shed with armfuls of roving

Peeking boldly under his cuffs and under his pant leg, one finds felted wool everywhere.

He graciously (well, grumpily) agreed to let go of his glass for a few minutes to hold a great armful of washed and carded wool or ‘roving’ in the Topsy Farms Wool Shed, demonstrating the medium from which he was built. We didn’t ask him to hold felting needles, thinking he might be sensitive on that point.

Creator Gesina purchased a giant bag or two of roving wool from Topsy in anticipation of her next project.

Topsy Farms has a huge range of needle felting supplies: 4 natural and 20 colours of washed and carded wool roving, beginner needle felting kits and hundreds of felting needles, available here:  http://store.topsyfarms.com/product-category/craft-supplies/.

Sir John’s hands have a wire armature, so adjust readily. He was glad to let go of the wool armfuls, and to again clutch his empty glass.

Gesina says “at home, he prefers to sit near the fireplace – it is also rather near the liquor cabinet.”

Contact Us Today:
Email: info@topsyfarms.com

Local: (613)389-3444
Toll Free: 888-287-3157

14775 Front Road, Stella, ON K0H 2S0

Click Here For Directions to Topsy Farms
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